How to Pair Wine with Food: A Comprehensive Guide

Wine pairing is an art form that involves selecting the perfect wine to complement a particular dish or meal. It is a way to enhance the flavors of both the food and the wine, creating a harmonious and delightful experience for the taste buds. But how does it work? Wine pairing is based on the principle that certain wines can enhance or neutralize the flavors of certain foods. For example, a robust red wine can complement a hearty meat dish, while a light white wine can complement a delicate fish dish. Understanding the basic principles of wine pairing can help you create the perfect pairing every time. In this comprehensive guide, we will explore the different factors that affect wine pairing, including the type of wine, the type of food, and even the cooking method. So whether you’re a wine connoisseur or just starting out, this guide will help you elevate your culinary experiences to the next level.

Understanding Wine Pairing

The Basics of Wine Pairing

What is wine pairing?

Wine pairing is the art of selecting the perfect wine to complement a particular dish or meal. It involves taking into account the flavors, textures, and overall characteristics of both the wine and the food to create a harmonious and enjoyable experience for the palate.

Why is it important?

Wine pairing is important because it can enhance the flavors of both the wine and the food, creating a more enjoyable and satisfying experience for the drinker. It can also help to balance out strong flavors and textures, making even complex dishes more approachable and easier to enjoy.

Basic principles of wine pairing

When it comes to wine pairing, there are a few basic principles to keep in mind:

  • Matching intensity: Wines with high acidity or tannin levels can pair well with foods that are also high in acidity or tannin.
  • Matching flavors: Wines with flavors of fruit, herbs, or spices can pair well with foods that have similar flavors.
  • Matching textures: Wines with creamy or oily textures can pair well with foods that have similar textures.
  • Balancing flavors: Wines with high alcohol or sweetness levels can be balanced by pairing them with foods that have contrasting flavors or textures.

Overall, the key to successful wine pairing is to think about the flavors and characteristics of both the wine and the food, and to experiment until you find a combination that works well for you.

Key Elements to Consider

When it comes to pairing wine with food, there are several key elements to consider. By understanding these elements, you can make informed decisions that will enhance the flavors of both your wine and your meal. Here are some of the most important factors to keep in mind:

Flavors and Tannins in Wine

The flavors and tannins in wine can have a significant impact on how it pairs with food. For example, tannins can be astringent and bitter, which can clash with the flavors of certain dishes. On the other hand, high acidity in wine can cut through rich or fatty foods, helping to balance their flavors.

When pairing wine with food, it’s important to consider the tannin levels of both the wine and the food. Wines with high tannins, such as red wines, tend to pair well with rich, savory dishes like steak or lamb. Meanwhile, white wines with high acidity, such as Sauvignon Blanc or Chardonnay, can pair well with lighter, fresher dishes like seafood or salads.

Flavors and Textures in Food

The flavors and textures of the food you’re serving can also play a significant role in how well it pairs with wine. For example, spicy or heavily seasoned dishes may call for a wine with high acidity or sweetness to help balance the flavors. Meanwhile, delicate or subtle flavors in a dish may require a wine with a softer, more nuanced flavor profile.

It’s also important to consider the textures of the food when pairing wine. For example, a light, delicate fish dish may pair well with a crisp, dry white wine, while a hearty, rich stew may call for a full-bodied red wine with tannins to help cut through the richness.

Regional and Cultural Influences on Wine Pairing

Finally, regional and cultural influences can also play a role in how wine is paired with food. Different cultures and cuisines may have their own traditional pairings that have been passed down through generations. For example, in France, wine is often paired with food based on the specific region or appellation, taking into account the local ingredients and flavors.

It’s important to keep these regional and cultural influences in mind when pairing wine with food, as they can provide valuable insights into how different wines can complement different dishes. However, it’s also important to remember that these pairings are just suggestions, and ultimately the best way to determine how well a wine pairs with a particular dish is to experiment and taste for yourself.

Wine and Food Pairing Techniques

Key takeaway: Pairing wine with food involves considering the flavors, textures, and overall characteristics of both the wine and the food to create a harmonious experience. The basic principles of wine pairing include matching intensity, flavors, and textures, and balancing flavors. The flavors and tannins in wine can have a significant impact on how it pairs with food, while the flavors and textures of the food can also play a role. It’s important to consider regional and cultural influences on wine pairing, but ultimately the best way to determine how well a wine pairs with a particular dish is to experiment and taste for yourself. White wines are best paired with lighter seafood, poultry, and vegetables, while red wines are best paired with meats and game. Sparkling wines can be paired with appetizers, desserts, and celebratory occasions, while dessert wines can be paired with fruits, pastries, chocolate, and spicy or rich dishes. When pairing wine with challenging dishes, it’s important to think outside the box and look for wines that can stand up to the intensity of the flavors. Common mistakes to avoid include pairing wine with the wrong flavors, textures, or too much or too little food. Wine pairing in different cuisines requires knowledge and practice, but with effort, perfect pairings can be achieved.

Pairing White Wines with Food

Pairing white wines with food can be a delicate process, as the wine’s acidity and flavor profile must complement the dish without overpowering it. Here are some tips for pairing white wines with different types of food:

Pairing White Wines with Seafood

When it comes to pairing white wines with seafood, the rule of thumb is to choose a wine that is crisp and refreshing. Sauvignon Blanc, Pinot Grigio, and Chardonnay are all great choices for pairing with seafood dishes.

  • Sauvignon Blanc pairs well with lighter seafood dishes such as sushi or seafood salad.
  • Pinot Grigio is a good choice for pairing with seafood pasta or risotto.
  • Chardonnay pairs well with rich seafood dishes such as lobster or scallops.

Pairing White Wines with Poultry and Vegetables

When pairing white wines with poultry and vegetables, it’s important to choose a wine that complements the flavors of the dish without overpowering them. Some good choices for pairing with poultry and vegetables include:

  • Sauvignon Blanc pairs well with light poultry dishes such as chicken salad or grilled chicken.
  • Pinot Grigio pairs well with lighter poultry dishes such as chicken piccata or chicken parmesan.
  • Chardonnay pairs well with richer poultry dishes such as roasted chicken or turkey.
See also  What is the Best Drink to Pair with Duck?

In terms of vegetables, Sauvignon Blanc and Pinot Grigio are good choices for pairing with lighter vegetable dishes such as salads or roasted vegetables. Chardonnay pairs well with richer vegetable dishes such as creamed spinach or mashed potatoes.

Pairing White Wines with Dairy Dishes

When pairing white wines with dairy dishes, it’s important to choose a wine that complements the richness of the cheese or cream. Some good choices for pairing with dairy dishes include:

  • Sauvignon Blanc pairs well with lighter cheese plates or cheese and fruit plates.
  • Pinot Grigio pairs well with lighter cheese plates or cheese and vegetable plates.
  • Chardonnay pairs well with richer cheese plates or cheese and meat plates.

Overall, when pairing white wines with food, it’s important to consider the flavors and textures of the dish and choose a wine that complements them without overpowering them. By following these tips, you can create delicious and harmonious wine and food pairings.

Pairing Red Wines with Food

Pairing red wines with meat and game

Red wines are known to be the perfect pairing for meats and game. The tannins in the wine complement the proteins in the meat, enhancing the flavors of both. Here are some guidelines for pairing red wines with different types of meat and game:

  • Beef: Full-bodied red wines such as Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, and Malbec are excellent choices for pairing with beef. The tannins in the wine will cut through the richness of the meat, balancing the flavors.
  • Lamb: Lamb is another protein that pairs well with full-bodied red wines. The spiciness of the meat can be complemented by the tannins in the wine, making for a delicious combination. Syrah, Zinfandel, and Bordeaux are great choices for pairing with lamb.
  • Pork: Pork is a versatile protein that can be paired with a variety of red wines. Lighter reds such as Pinot Noir and Gamay are good choices for pairing with pork chops or tenderloin. For roasted or grilled pork, a medium-bodied red wine such as Grenache or Tempranillo can be a great choice.
  • Game: Game meats such as venison, duck, and quail are often paired with full-bodied red wines such as Pinot Noir, Nebbiolo, and Rioja. The acidity and tannins in the wine can help cut through the richness of the game, while also complementing the earthy flavors.

Pairing red wines with cheese and chocolate

Red wines can also be paired with cheese and chocolate, providing a delicious and indulgent experience. Here are some guidelines for pairing red wines with cheese and chocolate:

  • Cheese: Full-bodied red wines such as Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, and Syrah are excellent choices for pairing with strong and pungent cheeses such as Blue Cheese, Roquefort, and Stilton. The tannins in the wine can help cut through the richness of the cheese, while the acidity can complement the flavors. For lighter cheeses such as Brie and Camembert, a lighter-bodied red wine such as Pinot Noir or Gamay can be a good choice.
  • Chocolate: Red wines can also be paired with chocolate, providing a delicious and unexpected flavor combination. The tannins in the wine can complement the bitter flavors in the chocolate, while the acidity can cut through the richness. Full-bodied red wines such as Port, Zinfandel, and Syrah are excellent choices for pairing with chocolate.

Pairing red wines with spicy and rich dishes

Red wines can also be paired with spicy and rich dishes, providing a balanced and flavorful experience. Here are some guidelines for pairing red wines with spicy and rich dishes:

  • Spicy Asian Fusion: Spicy Asian fusion dishes such as Thai curries and Korean BBQ can be paired with full-bodied red wines such as Syrah, Zinfandel, and Grenache. The tannins in the wine can help cut through the spiciness of the dish, while the acidity can complement the flavors.
  • Heavy Pastas: Heavy pasta dishes such as lasagna and carbonara can be paired with full-bodied red wines such as Barolo, Brunello di Montalcino, and Amarone. The tannins in the wine can help cut through the richness of the dish, while the acidity can complement the flavors.
  • Rich Seafood: Rich seafood dishes such as crab and lobster can be paired with full-bodied red wines such as Bordeaux, Syrah, and Zinfandel. The tannins in the wine can complement the richness of the seafood, while the acidity can cut through the heaviness.

In summary, red wines can be paired with a variety of foods, providing a delicious and balanced flavor experience. When pairing red wines with meat and game, it is important to consider the

Pairing Sparkling Wines with Food

Pairing sparkling wines with food can be a delicate art, but with the right techniques, it can result in a memorable dining experience. Here are some tips on how to pair sparkling wines with different types of food:

Pairing Sparkling Wines with Appetizers and Desserts

Sparkling wines are often served as an aperitif or as a dessert wine. When pairing sparkling wines with appetizers, look for flavors that complement the wine’s acidity and effervescence. Crisp and citrusy appetizers such as seafood, olives, and cured meats pair well with brut sparkling wines. Sweeter desserts like fruit tarts, pastries, and chocolate truffles can be balanced by the acidity of a rosé or demi-sec sparkling wine.

Pairing Sparkling Wines with Seafood and Poultry

Sparkling wines can also be a great match for seafood and poultry dishes. Brut sparkling wines are a classic pairing for oysters and other shellfish, while rosé sparkling wines pair well with white fish and chicken. The acidity of the wine helps to cut through the richness of the dish, while the bubbles help to cleanse the palate.

Pairing Sparkling Wines with Celebratory Occasions

Sparkling wines are often associated with special occasions, such as weddings, birthdays, and anniversaries. When pairing sparkling wines with celebratory meals, choose a wine that complements the flavors of the dish. A brut sparkling wine pairs well with savory dishes like roasted meats, while a sweeter wine like a blanc de blancs can complement creamy or sweet dishes. Additionally, champagne, in particular, is often served as a toasting wine during special occasions.

In summary, when pairing sparkling wines with food, consider the flavors of the dish and choose a wine that complements them. The acidity and effervescence of sparkling wines can help to cut through rich flavors, while the sweetness of the wine can balance out sweet dishes. Whether you’re serving sparkling wine as an aperitif or pairing it with a celebratory meal, the right pairing can elevate your dining experience.

Pairing Dessert Wines with Food

When it comes to pairing dessert wines with food, there are a few key techniques to keep in mind.

  • Pairing Dessert Wines with Fruits and Pastries
    When it comes to pairing dessert wines with fruits and pastries, it’s important to choose wines that are sweet and acidic to balance out the sweetness of the dessert. For example, a Moscato d’Asti pairs well with fruit tarts and fresh berries, while a Sauternes pairs well with apricot or citrus tarts.
  • Pairing Dessert Wines with Chocolate and Caramel
    When it comes to pairing dessert wines with chocolate and caramel, it’s important to choose wines that are rich and full-bodied to complement the richness of the dessert. For example, a Port wine pairs well with dark chocolate truffles and caramel-filled chocolates, while a Madeira wine pairs well with dark chocolate cake and caramel sauce.
  • Pairing Dessert Wines with Spicy and Rich Dishes
    When it comes to pairing dessert wines with spicy and rich dishes, it’s important to choose wines that are sweet and fruity to balance out the spiciness and richness of the dish. For example, a Sherry wine pairs well with spicy Mexican hot chocolate and churros, while a Vin Santo pairs well with rich cheesecake and caramelized fruit.
See also  What are the 3 V’s of Wine and How Do They Impact Your Tasting Experience?

In general, when pairing dessert wines with food, it’s important to choose wines that are sweet and acidic or rich and full-bodied to complement the flavors and textures of the dessert. By following these guidelines, you can create delicious and balanced wine and food pairings that will enhance your dining experience.

Tips and Tricks for Wine Pairing

Tips for Successful Wine Pairing

When it comes to pairing wine with food, there are several tips and tricks that can help ensure a successful match. Here are some tips to keep in mind:

  • Consider the wine’s origin and grape variety: Different regions and grape varieties can produce wines with distinct flavors and characteristics, which can affect how well they pair with certain foods. For example, a wine from the Pinot Noir grape variety from the Burgundy region of France may pair better with a beef dish than a wine from the same grape variety but from a different region.
  • Consider the dish’s preparation method and flavors: The way a dish is prepared and its flavors can also play a role in how well it pairs with wine. For example, a dish with strong spices may call for a wine with high acidity to balance out the flavors.
  • Consider the wine’s tannin and acidity levels: Tannin and acidity are two important components of wine that can affect how well it pairs with food. Tannin can give a wine a bitter and astringent taste, while acidity can help cut through rich and fatty dishes. A wine with high tannin levels may pair better with a rich and fatty dish, while a wine with high acidity levels may pair better with a lighter dish.

Tricks for Overcoming Challenging Pairings

  • Pairing wine with spicy or fatty foods
  • Pairing wine with dishes with strong flavors
  • Pairing wine with dishes that are difficult to pair

Pairing Wine with Spicy or Fatty Foods

When it comes to pairing wine with spicy or fatty foods, the key is to find a wine that can stand up to the intensity of the flavors. For spicy foods, a wine with high acidity can help to cut through the heat and balance the flavors. Sauvignon Blanc, Pinot Grigio, and Vermentino are all good choices for pairing with spicy dishes.

For fatty foods, a wine with a bit of sweetness can help to balance out the richness. Riesling and Chenin Blanc are both good choices for pairing with fatty dishes, as they have a bit of sweetness and acidity that can help to cut through the richness.

Pairing Wine with Dishes with Strong Flavors

Dishes with strong flavors, such as those with intense herbs or spices, can be challenging to pair with wine. One trick is to look for wines that have similar flavors to the dish. For example, if you are serving a dish with lots of herbs, look for a wine with herbal notes, such as a Sauvignon Blanc or a Rosemary Zinfandel.

Another trick is to look for wines that have high acidity, which can help to cut through the richness of the dish. A wine with high acidity, such as a dry Riesling or a Pinot Grigio, can help to balance out the flavors of a dish with strong herbs or spices.

Pairing Wine with Difficult-to-Pair Dishes

Finally, when it comes to pairing wine with difficult-to-pair dishes, the key is to think outside the box. For example, if you are serving a dish with lots of conflicting flavors, such as sweet and savory, look for a wine that can balance out those flavors. A off-dry Riesling or a Moscato d’Asti can help to balance out the sweet and savory flavors of a dish.

Another trick is to look for wines that have a bit of tannin, which can help to add structure and balance to a dish. A wine with tannin, such as a Syrah or a Cabernet Sauvignon, can help to add structure to a dish with conflicting flavors.

In summary, when it comes to pairing wine with food, it’s important to think outside the box and look for wines that can stand up to the intensity of the flavors. Whether you’re pairing wine with spicy or fatty foods, dishes with strong flavors, or difficult-to-pair dishes, there are plenty of tricks and techniques that can help you find the perfect pairing.

Common Mistakes to Avoid

Pairing wine with the wrong flavors

One common mistake when pairing wine with food is selecting a wine that has flavors that clash with the dish. For example, pairing a highly tannic red wine with a heavily spiced dish can result in an unpleasant combination of flavors. It’s important to consider the flavors of both the wine and the food and choose a wine that complements rather than overpowers the dish.

Pairing wine with the wrong textures

Another mistake to avoid when pairing wine with food is selecting a wine with a texture that clashes with the dish. For example, pairing a light-bodied white wine with a rich, creamy sauce can result in a lack of balance in the pairing. It’s important to consider the textures of both the wine and the food and choose a wine that has a texture that complements the dish.

Pairing wine with too much or too little food

Pairing wine with too much or too little food can also result in an unbalanced pairing. It’s important to consider the volume of food and choose a wine that has enough body and flavor to stand up to a large portion, while also not overpowering a small portion. It’s also important to consider the intensity of the flavors in the dish and choose a wine that has enough acidity or tannin to balance the flavors.

Wine Pairing in Different Cuisines

Italian Cuisine

When it comes to wine pairing, Italian cuisine offers a wide range of flavors and textures that can be challenging to pair with the right wine. However, with a little bit of knowledge and guidance, you can easily create perfect wine and food pairings that will elevate your dining experience.

  • Pairing wine with pasta, pizza, and seafood
    Pasta, pizza, and seafood are some of the most popular Italian dishes that are enjoyed all over the world. When it comes to pairing wine with these dishes, you should consider the type of pasta or pizza topping, as well as the sauce used. For example, a light-bodied white wine such as Pinot Grigio pairs well with lighter pasta dishes, while a full-bodied red wine like Barolo pairs well with hearty meat-based pasta dishes. For pizza, a light-bodied red wine like Pinot Noir pairs well with seafood pizza, while a full-bodied red wine like Chianti pairs well with meat-based pizza.
  • Pairing wine with meat and cheese dishes
    Italian cuisine is also famous for its delicious meat and cheese dishes, such as prosciutto, mortadella, and mozzarella. When pairing wine with these dishes, you should consider the fat content and intensity of flavor. For example, a light-bodied white wine like Pinot Grigio pairs well with lighter cheese dishes, while a full-bodied red wine like Amarone pairs well with rich and intense meat dishes.
  • Pairing wine with desserts
    Italian cuisine is also famous for its delicious desserts, such as Tiramisu, Panna Cotta, and Mascarpone Cheese Cake. When pairing wine with these desserts, you should consider the sweetness and texture of the dessert. For example, a light-bodied white wine like Moscato pairs well with sweet and fruity desserts, while a sweet and luscious red wine like Brachetto d’Acqui pairs well with creamy and rich desserts.
See also  How are Wine Pairings Determined?

Overall, pairing wine with Italian cuisine requires some knowledge and practice, but with a little bit of effort, you can easily create perfect wine and food pairings that will elevate your dining experience.

French Cuisine

French cuisine is renowned for its sophistication and finesse, and when it comes to pairing wine, it’s no different. The French have a long-standing tradition of wine pairing, and their knowledge of how different wines complement different dishes is unparalleled. Here are some guidelines for pairing wine with French cuisine:

  • Pairing wine with sauces and stocks: French cuisine is known for its rich and complex sauces, which can range from velvety smooth to sharp and tangy. When pairing wine with French sauces, it’s important to consider the flavors of the sauce and choose a wine that will complement them. For example, a light-bodied red wine like Pinot Noir pairs well with sauces that are lighter and more delicate, such as a sauce poivrade, while a full-bodied red wine like Bordeaux pairs well with heartier sauces like a sauce au vin.
  • Pairing wine with meats and poultry: French cuisine is also known for its delicious meats and poultry dishes, which can range from roasted chicken to beef bourguignon. When pairing wine with these dishes, it’s important to consider the cooking method and seasonings used. For example, a white wine like Chardonnay pairs well with chicken dishes that are lightly seasoned or roasted, while a red wine like a Côte Rôtie pairs well with beef dishes that are rich and savory.
  • Pairing wine with cheese and desserts: French cuisine is also famous for its cheese and desserts, which can range from soft and creamy to crisp and tangy. When pairing wine with French cheese and desserts, it’s important to consider the flavors of the cheese or dessert and choose a wine that will complement them. For example, a sweet white wine like Sauternes pairs well with delicate cheeses like Brie or soft cheese cake, while a sparkling wine like Champagne pairs well with more robust cheeses like Roquefort or Stilton.

Overall, pairing wine with French cuisine requires attention to detail and an understanding of the complex flavors and textures of the dishes. By following these guidelines, you can elevate your French culinary experience to new heights.

Spanish Cuisine

  • Pairing wine with tapas and small plates
    • Consider the flavors and textures of the dishes
    • Look for wines that complement or contrast with the flavors
    • Experiment with different wine regions and grape varieties
  • Pairing wine with seafood and paella
    • Choose wines that are not too heavy or tannic
    • Look for wines that match the flavors of the seafood or paella
    • Consider the cooking method and seasoning of the dish
  • Pairing wine with cured meats and cheese
    • Consider the intensity and flavor of the cured meat or cheese

When it comes to pairing wine with Spanish cuisine, there are a few key things to keep in mind. First, consider the flavors and textures of the dishes you will be serving. This will help you determine what types of wines will complement or contrast with the flavors of the food. Next, look for wines that are made in the same region as the dish you will be serving. This can help you find wines that have similar flavors and textures to the food. Finally, don’t be afraid to experiment with different wine regions and grape varieties. This can help you find new and exciting pairings that you may not have tried before.

Asian Cuisine

When it comes to pairing wine with Asian cuisine, there are a few key things to keep in mind. First, it’s important to consider the spiciness of the dish. Wines that are high in acidity and tannin can help to cut through the heat of spicy dishes. Additionally, wines that are low in alcohol can help to balance out the richness of many Asian dishes.

Pairing wine with sushi and sashimi

When it comes to pairing wine with sushi and sashimi, it’s important to consider the type of fish being served. White wines are generally a good choice for lighter fish such as tuna, salmon, and halibut. Sauvignon Blanc, Pinot Grigio, and Chardonnay are all good choices for pairing with sushi and sashimi. For rich, fatty fish such as salmon or eel, a light to medium-bodied red wine such as Pinot Noir can be a good choice.

Pairing wine with noodles and rice dishes

When it comes to pairing wine with noodles and rice dishes, it’s important to consider the flavors of the dish. For dishes with bold flavors such as curry or teriyaki, a full-bodied red wine such as a Cabernet Sauvignon or Syrah can be a good choice. For lighter dishes such as stir-fry or lo mein, a crisp white wine such as Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc can be a good choice.

Pairing wine with spicy and rich dishes

When it comes to pairing wine with spicy and rich dishes, it’s important to consider the flavors of the dish. Wines that are high in acidity and tannin can help to cut through the heat of spicy dishes. Syrah, Zinfandel, and Petite Sirah are all good choices for pairing with spicy dishes. For rich, hearty dishes such as beef stir-fry or lo mein, a full-bodied red wine such as a Bordeaux or a Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon can be a good choice.

FAQs

1. What is wine pairing?

Wine pairing is the art of selecting the right wine to complement a particular dish or meal. It involves considering the flavors, textures, and aromas of both the wine and the food to create a harmonious combination.

2. Why is wine pairing important?

Wine pairing can enhance the flavors of both the wine and the food, creating a more enjoyable dining experience. It can also help to balance out strong flavors and enhance subtler flavors.

3. What factors should be considered when pairing wine with food?

Several factors should be considered when pairing wine with food, including the type of wine (red, white, sparkling, etc.), the type of food (meat, fish, vegetables, etc.), the cooking method used (grilled, roasted, etc.), and the seasoning used in the dish.

4. What are some general wine pairing guidelines?

Some general wine pairing guidelines include pairing white wines with lighter dishes and seafood, pairing red wines with heavier dishes and meat, and pairing sparkling wines with appetizers and lighter fare.

5. What are some specific wine pairing recommendations for different types of food?

Some specific wine pairing recommendations include pairing Sauvignon Blanc with asparagus, pairing Pinot Noir with salmon, pairing Merlot with lamb, and pairing Cabernet Sauvignon with beef.

6. How can I improve my wine pairing skills?

To improve your wine pairing skills, you can start by learning about the different flavors and aromas found in wine and how they interact with different foods. You can also experiment with different wines and foods to find out what works best for you. It can also be helpful to read wine pairing guides and seek advice from wine experts.

Wine Pairing 101 | Super Easy Food and Wine Pairing from V is for Vino


Posted

in

by

Tags:

Comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *